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Live Art Performance: Malta

Posted by Tom Estes on Saturday, August 22, 2015, In : Malta 


Tom Estes Live Art Performance: The Anomaly
 outside the Co-Cathedral of St. John, Valletta. The most famous artist who worked in Malta has to be Caravaggio. His 'work is on display inside, the Oratory of the Co-Cathedral of St. John, Valletta. However, while in Malta, Caravaggio was imprisoned in Fort St. Angelo (accused of sodomy) and later escaped to Sicily, only to die two years later at the age of 38 still hounded by the forces of justice.

I created this character ‘The Bell Ringer’ for...
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Emoticon @ The Encyclopedic Palace, La Biennale di Venezia

Posted by Tom Estes on Saturday, August 22, 2015, In : Venice Biennale 


Emoticon @ The Encyclopedic Palace, La Biennale di Venezia 2013 for The Biennial Project

http://www.the-biennial-project.com/VB2013Accepted.aspx


You’ve definitely seen it at some point. Maybe it was in a lecture in college. Maybe it was in a TED talk you watched recently. Someone is trying to explain some important historical connection, drawing up a grand theory of art or science or human progress, and there it is, as if by reflex: the hand lifts in front of them like an upturned claw, the f...
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Swampy- Venice Flooded!

Posted by Tom Estes on Friday, June 8, 2012, In : Venice Biennale 



 Venice is flooded

Swampy: Venice is Flooded - Live Art Guerrilla Action as part of 'Bizzare Artist Happenings' with The Biennial Project  (as featured by Tate Shots at The 54th  Venice Bienniale) 


 

On the 7th of  June 2011, the waters of the lagoon rose up and flooded Venice. As the waters rose, a strange creature appeared out of nowhere, and climbed the steps up from the Lagoon and entered the Giardini while the Venice Biennale was taking place... 




Through the Live Art Performance 'Swampy', ar...


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Tom Estes Drink & Dial Hotline at WW Gallery

Posted by Tom Estes on Thursday, June 7, 2012, In : Drink & Dial Hotline 


The work of artist Tom Estes at WW Gallery Drink & Dial exhibition 27 Mar - 6 May 2010


 For the WW Gallery Artist Tom Estes created a Drink and Dial Hotline complete with printed cards to hand out and telephone line to call. Estes' DRINK & DIAL HOTLINE  taps into the talismanic use of the mobile phone that expresses a feeling of both sentimental and implicitly magical: the attempt to contact or lay claiim to another space, another reality. As they say "Many a true word is spoken in jest" and i...

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Gallery Interaction by Tom Estes at The De La Warr Pavilion

Posted by Tom Estes on Friday, June 1, 2012, In : Gallery Interaction 




Tom Estes ~ Gallery interaction~ The De La Warr Pavilion, 29th of August, 2010

"I have been collecting newspaper articles for about twenty years. Basically it’s a bit autobiographical as the collection is made up of things I have found of interest or things that I like or think are funny. I use to put them into drawers and then bin liners but now I have so many clippings now that I have started to put them into ring binder folders with plastic sleeves. I guess it probably seems a bit mad, as...
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Sewing Performance at Trinity Buoy Wharf

Posted by Tom Estes on Friday, June 1, 2012, In : Sewing Performance 

 Tom Estes in Sewing Performance, Trinity Buoy Wharf




"This ‘Sewing Performance’ was created as the culmination of a residency at Trinity Buoy Wharf. In this work I gently embroider leaves and vines onto a bespoke or tailor- made suit, causing a dimpling of the material. This sewing has the effect of slowly shrivelling the arms and legs of the suit. So in a way the work is really about being powerless in the face of exploitation and is intended to accentuate a core of wordless confusion and...
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Yogurt Weaving by Tom Estes

Posted by Tom Estes on Friday, June 1, 2012, In : Yogurt Weaving 



 
Performance: Yogurt Weaving

Tom Estes’ Performance ‘Yogurt Weaving’ took place on a small hill called 'Dr. Watt’s Mound', the exact same spot where Isaac Watts, recognised as the "Father of English Hymnody" wrote many of his famous hyms (17 July 1674 – 25 November 1748).

Dr. Watts Mound
Isaac Watts was the first prolific and popular English hymnwriter, credited with some 750 hymns. Sacred music scholar Stephen Marini (2003) describes the ways in which Watts contributed to English hymn...

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Cake Hole at ArtEvict

Posted by Tom Estes on Thursday, May 31, 2012, In : Cake Hole 


 
On July 17th, 2010, Tom Estes staged the performance ‘Cake Hole’ as a participant in ArtEvict, at The New Lansdowne Club, 195 Mare St. Hackney, London E8 


In this performance I cut holes in donuts while members of the audience take pictures on a communal camera that is passed around. The simple act of cutting holes in donuts is based on a slang term in activist circles meaning doing something that has little or no real impact. The title of the work is also from a slang term. Generally exp...

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Performance


Tom Estes As an artist I have always leaned toward making Live Art performance work that is participatory or immersive in some way. In my Live Art performance I stage an 'action' and then ask members of the audience to take pictures on a communal camera. In this way, the audience becomes part of the performance, and the pictures are then posted on on-line social networking sites and web sites for another, wider on-line audience. For me, fantasy and illusion are not contradictions of reality, but instead an integral part of our everyday lives. There is a real Peter Pan Syndrome at play in my work and I suppose I would consider myself to be a carnival sideshow conceptualist, combining a bare-bones formal conceptualism with an eternally adolescent, prank DIY comic-approach. At the core of this work is an attention to the flickering, fading definition of our lives as dictated by the computer monitor and the rapid reply of instant messaging. I strive, not to break down these introverted, often self-imposed boundaries, but to look at how dataflow from the virtual realm impacts on the significance and symbolism of real-world human senses. But in doing so, I have begun to generate unexpected questions about how art might be able to inscribe itself on the surface of reality- not to represent itself on the surface of reality –not to represent reality, nor to duplicate it, but to replace it.

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